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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
that we need higher fuel tax, and we can use that either to reduce the deficit or to pay for something else. it was designed -- or intended -- whether it has done so successfully or not, it was done to pay for infrastructure. >> absolutely. we are not real happy about that. >> john, what are you hoping for next week? >> for some reason, i have not been consulted on that. the president in the campaign said he was 4 and all of the above energy policy, so let's have some announcements that support that -- he was for an " all of the above" energy policy. let's move forward with the things that you need to do to accomplish that policy. i would say that we would also -- i would like to see stop this discussion about taxing the industry and trying to characterize it as subsidies, which is simply not true, and i would like to see more opportunities in terms of where we can open up areas that are off-limits right now. all those combined can generate an enormous amount of opportunity for the economy right when we need it. >> i will just mention a couple of things. i think lenders have been reall
with a record debt and deficit, threat of global warming, threat of global poverty, of pandemics, of national security challenges like continuing war on terrorism, the instability of iran and north korea, rising powers, turmoil across the middle east, turmoil in north africa, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and the growing threat of cyberattacks. how we confront these problems, how we deal with these challenges will in many ways determine that future course of america. it will determine whether the united states will be a leader in the 21st century or whether we will be just another failed empire in history. to succeed we will depend on the resilience of our economy, the strength of our diplomatic and military institutions and above all, the effectiveness of our political system that underpins in many ways what we do as a country. and that brings me to what i see as perhaps the most urgent task facing this nation and facing all of us and that is overcoming the partisan dysfunction in congress that poses a threat to our quality of life, to our national security, to our economy
out of washington to get our deficits under control. hopefully, we do not have to many quarters where we end up in negative territory. this is not an economy growing six percent and can hinder those bibles easily. host: magnolia, texas, david, better. caller: [indiscernible]we are doing great here. i noticed the super bowl is forming dollars per minute. everything is packed. all of the football stadiums. i do not see any recession. host: you said you are doing better why? caller: i live 15 miles from where they are building the number one country in the world. we are getting roads. it is unbelievable around here. we have job signs everywhere. as far as the savings, when interest rates are 1.5%, who will put their money in the bank? bernanke wants you to put it in stocks. that is why there is no interest rate. i took my money for years ago when i bought those rifles. i have made so much money on them. it is unbelievable. host: he mentioned social security. there is a category about the social safety net. guest: we use the term government social benefits to cover quite a few different p
families. and that means a balanced package that will reduce our long-term deficit and debt, but that still allows us to invest in those things that we need to grow right now because that's also a deficit reduction agenda that's growing faster. and in order to have a balanced package that means that we've already done a lot of cuts. we've done some revenue now, and so the rest of the way moving forward we can do some additional reforms and make our health care programs work better and make them more efficient, and we can cut out programs that we don't need, but it also means that we've got to be able to close some tax loopholes and deductions that the average american cannot take advantage of, to raise the revenue, to actually do the job in a way that allows us to continue to grow. now, the reason this is relevant is because i gather and i haven't gotten this from first-hand sources, but from second hand sources in the press that our friends on the other side of the aisle, their position is we're concerned about the sequester. we recognize that just cutting the federal spending with the mea
. grappling with a record debt and deficits, threat of global warming, threat of global poverty, pandemics, of national security challenges like continuing war on terrorism, instability of iran and north korea, rising powers, turmoil across the middle east, turmoil in north africa, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and the growing threat of cyber attacks. how we confront these problems, how we deal with these challenges will in many ways determine the future course of america. it will determine whether the united states will be a leader in the 21st century, or whether we will be just another failed empire in history. to succeed, we will depend on the resilience of our economy, the strength of our diplomatic and military institutions, and above all, the effectiveness of our political system. that underpins in many ways everything we do as a country. and that brings me to what i see as perhaps the most urgent task, facing this nation and facing all of us. and that is overcoming the partisan dysfunction in congress that poses a threat to our quality of life, to our national se
there are members here that agree, you got to address the larger deficit issue and to address a large deficit issue and my own experience having participated in every budget summit that we've had in past years, you got to be able to develop a balanced package in order to do that. that's just the nature of dealing with the size deficit -- size of deficits that you got. my preference, frankly, is that the congress would do the big deal, get it done, get this behind us, detrigger sequester, some this constant uncertainty, this month-to-month situation where we don't know what the hell we're going to get. that should end. in the absence of that deal, obviously i'll support whatever package you can put together to try to detrigger sequester. whatever you can do to make sure this doesn't happen. i mean, i cannot imagine that people would stand by and deliberately hurt this country in terms of our national defense by letting this take place. >> i'll only add briefly that most of the things we're doing are reversible. that is our goal, that they would be reversible. even if you reverse them it will take so
. you've got to address the larger deficit issue, and to address the larger deficit issue -- and my own experience. i've participated in every budget summit we have indiana past -- we have had in past years. you have to develop a balanced package. that's the nature of dealing with the size deficits you've got. and my preference, frankly, is that the congress would do the big deal, get it done, get this behind us, detrigger sequester, stop this constant uncertainty. this month-to-month situation where we don't know what the hell we're going to get. that should end. in the absence of that deal, obviously i'll support whatever package you can put together to try to detrigger sequester. whatever you can do to make sure this doesn't happen. i mean, i cannot imagine that people would stand by and deliberately hurt this country in terms of our national defense by letting this take place. >> i'll only add briefly that most of the things we're doing are reversible. that is our goal, they would be reversible, but even if you reverse them it will take some time -- and i can't predict that yet -- w
, yes, deficits and taxes and sequesters and potential government shutdowns, debt ceiling, we'll talk about that stuff. but we'll talk about it from the perspective on how we're making sure someone works hard in this country. a cop, teacher, a construction worker, or a reception worker, they can make it if they work hard. their kids can make it and dream bigger dreams than they have achieved. obviously, a lot of what we'll be working on over the next few weeks is going to be on how do we deal with this sequester issue. i want to make this quick point. i had a press conference this week in which i reiterated that i'm prepared, eager, and ang shouse that ends this government by crisis that every two week or every two months or every six months we are threatening this hard recovery, are finally housing is picking up and real estate is doing better and unemployment numbers are still too high. we're geing job growth and manufacturing is doing well and we continue to have these self-inflicted crisis here in washington where suddenly someone taps the brakes. what i said this week was i want
references to the trust deficit that has at times existed between this committee and the cia. if i'm confirmed, the address the deficit between the committee and the cia would be wholly unacceptable and i would make it my goal on day one of my tenure and every day thereafter to strengthen the trust between us. i have a reputation for speaking my mind, and at times doing so in a direct manner, which some attribute to my new jersey routes. -- roots. i would like to think that my candor would reassure you that you'll get straight answers from me, maybe not always those you will like, but you will get answers and they will reflect my honest views. that is the commitment i made to you. i would like to finish by saying a few words about the importance of taking care of the women and men who serve in the cia. because the of the secretiveness that the intelligence work requires, few americans will ever know the making sacrifices that these professionals and their families make every day. many have risked their lives and at times have given their lives to keep our country states. -- safe. i
washington journal they talk about the recent article suggesting that a trust deficit by americans toward government and financial sector could be holding back the economic recovery. my cartoons depict can da that and humor. why started the cartoon, they were native characters and native situations. and my audience was geared toward natives. in the last four or five years they have become more universal where they stilled to the mainstream dominant culture. it's more universal now. i'm inspired by the people that are that i grew up with. my friend, my family, members of my tribe. and basically watching people and some of the things they do. it's surprising, if you pay attention to what people do and what people say, there's a lot of humor you can find in that, you know, making your own twists and certain things. >> people who have read my cartoons for the first time. i hope they take with them the appreciation of a native culture and native way of life. because it's not always depicted correctly in cinema or in books. but this cartoon coming from a genuine native american and these are my
and deficit debate is harmful to the business environment now? >> the uncertainty is back. the amount of -- the uncertainty is bad. you go from the fiscal cliff to the deficit debate to sequestration. that is inherently disruptive to business investment. certainty is a good multiplier. we are these long cycle businesses that have global competition. i do not have the lecture he to say that i will quit investing for six months until this is reserved. -- resolved. i will keep going. the people who can hurt the worst by all of this are the small and medium businesses. the people that have no buffer. that get confused. these are the people that are the heart of the u.s. economy. they are the ones that are constantly being bombarded as we go from one to another. this can only be solved here. this is one of the few cases where the business roundtable of people speak with one voice. it would be great to get a resolution. >> there is a divide in the corporate side on the corporate tax front. large companies would benefit more from corporate tax reform, especially going to a territorial system
to deficit reduction. the chairman of the president's council of economic advisers said, quote, today's report is a reminder of the importance of the need for congress to act to avoid self-inflicted wounds to the economy. on the plus side there was a jump in hiring despite the uncertainty washington faced as it flirted with going over the fiscal cliff at the end of the year. jon. jon: wendell goler at the white house krupb -fg some number crunching some numbers for us, thank you. jenna: for more of a look at the 7.9 unemployment rate we'll take a look a little bit of how the numbers really affect the average american. right now the labor department says there are nearly 12.5 million unemployed americans in this country. that doesn't include the so-called marginally attached. there's nearly 2.5 million people who are unemployed who have stopped looking for a new job, that is the number that represents them, or the 8 million people who are forced to work part time because they simply can't find full time work. overall the jobless problem is expecting close to 23 million people, and that
to be weatheri the country's fiscal uncertainty, but it is doing so nervously. >> we have massive deficits, a big tax increase hat no apparent willingness to get government off people's backs by reducing government spending, and all of that is a heavy, heavy weight on the private sector. firms around the nation are sitting on cash instead of creating jobs. >> reporter: on wednesday the commerce department announced economic growth actually fell to a-10% the last three months of last year, the chairman of the president's council of economic advisers says other indicators remain positive. >> consumer spending increased. business investment. residential construction. >> reporter: the jobs report showed a larger number of people dropped out of the labour force than down jobs. a former administration economist says some of that is to be expected. >> the population is aging, so we expect to have a fair number of people retiring every month for the next ten years or more as the baby boomers retire. >> reporter: the conference board reports a sharp increase in the number of older workers considering dela
, what is the surest way to create a more hopeful world for our children, how we will reduce our deficit, what kinds of tax plans will have, how we will make sure every child is getting a good every child, it is encouraging to me that you turned out so well by your mom not letting you watch tv. i am going to tell my daughters that when they complain. [laughter] in the midst of all these debates, we must keep that same humility that dr. king and lincoln, washington and all our great leaders, understood, is at the core of true leadership. a democracy as big and as diverse as ours, we will encounter every opinion, and our task as citizens, whether we are leaders in government or business or spreading the word, it is to spend our days with open hearts and open minds, to seek out the truth that exists in the opposing view, and find a common ground that allows for us as a nation, as a people to take real and meaningful action, tnd we have to do that, humbly, and we have to do it every day, not just at a prayer breakfast. i have to say this is now our fifth prayer breakfast, and it is always ju
or not tall from the standpoint of the deficit. the second point i want to make is in line with what bob said. if you were to make a typology of a foreign policy challenges of the united states, it might go something like this. there are crises that involve the of the values and the interest and the interests but not the values and both with some overlap. we pursue our interests hopefully not the point that we are right of a moral crisis that we generate. there are certain challenges which do not seem to involve our interests very much but to bring our values and to question and the classic example of that would have been rwanda and i will get back to that in a moment and then there was a majority of foreign policy challenges. syria and given the magnitude of the humanitarian crisis, the strategic importance of the country there is no greater blow that can be dealt to iran at this moment than the fall of the assad regime from there is no greater blow that can be dealt to hezbollah are dealt to hamas the in the fall of the regime. if one wants to be a coldhearted realist and put together of th
a $16 trillion deficit, 51 million people on food stamps. our culture is an entitlement culture and yet we're going after 13 million people who have an immigration problem. hey, i'm all for vetting them. how about reverse discrimination for once in this country. if we're going to demand exceptionalism, we should have it towards the immigrants whether they come legally or illegally and also go back to americans who are u.s. citizens. >> are you talking about expelling americans? >> i'm all for demotion of citizenship. i agree with you. it may be extreme. but here's my point. how many of you. >> keep it short. >> how many of you have a trouble in a third world country and you come back to america and have a different experience about exceptionalism. what about reverse immigration? >> i do not support the deportation of american citizens but if that were to be a policy, what you would do is save hundreds of billions of dollars a year in the welfare state because immigrants are less likely to use welfare each when naturalized and americans who are poor. that's an interesting result of that.
, food insufficiency. you. you can't just overcome those kinds of deficits by providing a headstart education program. so that is where the book began and most of the people advised me and said it's an interesting book and i'm sure you'll get on fox tv. that was not my goal. my. my goal was not to be a critic. i said well, okay let me depart two of the book. there are some social programs that are really quite effective and maybe we can learn a lesson from that. a big quiz in the course of writing the book that i conducted and bored to death my wife and children was let me sit down with everybody and tell me the three government programs that have been the most effective in the last 65 years. almost every one of my academic friends with a headstart and i would say wrong. no evidence. the most effective government program in chronological order our social security, the g.i. bill of 1944 and medicare in 1955. there will be some pushback about that. even "usa today" had an editorial this week is that social security is a pay-as-you-go program. no, it's not. i can never go broke provide
who has worked with budgets throughout my life, in order to deal with the deficit problem, you've got to deal with entitlements. you have to deal with revenues. and you have to deal with discretionary. all of it has to be part of a package. >> is he doing enough? >> i think he's pushing as hard as he can. >> should he be more public? >> well, look. the president of the united states has indicated the concern about sequester. he's indicated his concern about maintaining a strong national defense. and he's proposed a solution to this. the ball is in congress' court. they have got to take action to delay sequester. >> i want to move on to some of the hot spots. we'll start in north africa. a lot of news this week. here is the a.p. headline. u.s. limited in fight against north african militants. the united states is struggling to confront an uptick in threats in the newest hot spot with limited intelligence and few partners to help as the obama administration weighs who you to keep islamic extremists from jeopardizing national security without launching war. we want to put up a map here.
understand that, yes, we need to reduce the deficit, but it shouldn't just be on the backs of seniors. it shouldn't be just on the backs of young people who are trying to get a college education. it should not be on the backs of parents who are trying to give their kids a better start in life. that all of us have to participate and that, in fact, it's important for us to make sure we've got a strong national defense and that we reduce our spending in a smart way. those of us who are luckiest in the society to close a few loopholes and deductions that the average american doesn't get. if that's the choice that we've got, i promise you we can win that debate because we're on the right side of this argument. i hope -- i expect that you guys will be with me on that. last point i'll make, obviously economic growth is a priority. making sure that we're opening up opportunity for everybody is also important. that's why emgregs reform is so critical. i said this is going to be a top priority and an early priority of my administration. i am heartened to see republicans and democrats starting t
of this administration is the lack of priority and funding for the military. while they've increased the deficit by $5.3 trillion in four years, the only major part of the budget has been decreased is the military. that's something pretty well- known. a lot of people don't like that idea. the thing that bothers me just as much is putting the agenda, another agenda under the military budget. for example, you have heard senator mccain and me and others talk about the fact that the navy paid for 450,000 gallons of fuel, some $26 a gallon. you can get it on the market for $3. the air force, same thing. except it's $59 a gallon. and so the question i would have of you is just a commitment that if you are confirmed, will you confine the dollars that we are going to spend in the defense budget for defense purposes, for war-fighting purposes? >> well, of course i will because that's the intent of our budget and department of defense. >> i appreciate that very much. there was an article the other day in "the washington post" by jennifer ruben called, "our dim witted state department." it's kind of an interesti
be raised again. >> how a template of a increasing the deficit in effect the economy and financial markets? >> where do you know the answer. it's sort of jan at the bill and i went to expect this. when initially proposed, some analysts say it's for uncertain, we can't keep raising the debt limit for threatening to default after a few. so far it's not cause the latter can turn. the next thing we have to worry about is the sequestration has, which baumbach $85 billion in the remainder of this fiscal year and that hates march 1st. then we've got another deadline on march 27. so at this point, those things are more likely to damage the economy in the short term than this bill. although could play russian roulette later this summer, and that's going to be a problem as well. spoon mixture into the "washington post," thank you. >> thanks. >> she loved being first lady. she got the job for less than a year, but it was julie tyler who ordered the marines to play out to the chief of the president appears, a custom we still follow. subject to more criticism, greeted her guests on a throne on a raised
thing with the deficit commission he created withers kin bowles a few years back. he is paying a lot of lip service to the american public about their top concerns and top concerns of this country and not having a lot of action or substantive action to bring about real solutions. bill: here are the fact we know, alan. in 24 months they met four times. >> correct. the empty met with them four times. there were other meetings the president did not attend. by the way they have been active 16 of 35 proposals and only two year charter. i wonder were republicans praise worthy when they formed the council and saying we don't need a council. that will not create jobs. now all of sudden they're upset he is ending the council. they never sported it first place. bill: implemented 16 recommendations. can you name one. >> i don't have the list here, but all the reports come out say that's what he did. bill: can you name one that worked? >> i don't have the list of them, bill. but the fact is the cynical, cynicism you seem to express as though simply having a jobs council, that is what creates job
where we extol the virtues of good business and fiscal policy and we fight the deficit and we don't advocate the printing of money in obscene amounts just to cover our debts. we have to rein in entitlements. >> steve: look at that! you've already got your stump speech down. if you do run for senate, though, you can't be on tv or the radio. >> you know, the senate race is still a good year away, steve. so i've got some time to hone a message, get around and ride my harley to all parts of garden state. >> steve: look, i think brian's got a campaign -- >> i hope i can count on brian. >> brian: a new bumper sticker. >> gretchen: are you going to do it? >> i very well may. erica and i are talking about it. remember, i believe in immigration reform. i believe in gay rights and gay marriage. i believe in choice. not obscenely, but i believe in roe v wade. so you have to take my fiscal positions on being a republican who believes that we have to bail out future generations rather than in debt future generations with some of these social policies that aren't in sync with traditional politi
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)